Slava Posudevsky

About the Artist

Slava Posudevsky was born 1963 in the central Ukrainian village of Zhezhelliv. His mother fostered his early love of architecture, music, and art by sending him to an art school at the age of 10. It was there that Slava first grasped the fundamentals of line, colour, and structural compositions. His early paintings depict houses, portraits, and still lifes. His true passion for painting and creative integrity would come later, but it was essential to start with these basic technical compositions.

At 19, Slava was sent to the army to begin his mandatory two-year service in the Soviet military. This was a most interesting time in his life as superiors noticed his skills. While rising to the rank of Sergeant Major and commanding a platoon of 30 men and 4 tanks, he was given the charge of creating propaganda art for the military as well as creating the murals that adorned the walls of the military clubs and bars. While he enjoyed laying his brush to the canvas and gaining further technical skill, there was absolutely no room for creative freedom and after his two year conscription has ended, Slava entered the university. While still enjoying painting, he felt that architecture was where he would find a career. So, at 21, he entered the architectural faculty at the Building and Construction University in Kiev. Slava actively designed new buildings, which were realized during his university years. He continued painting, creating installation art for parks, grammar schools, and professional buildings. He continued his studies for 5 1/2 years and when finished found a world much different than the one he had expected to live in. The year was 1989 and with it, the fall of communism.

Ukraine, like other post-communist countries immediately became centres of growth and commerce and these first few years following the fall were prosperous ones. Slava spent his time designing new banks and painting in his free time. But, that would end in 1994 when Ukraine’s economy collapsed causing a surge of immigration to the West. Slava had visited Prague before, but now found the capital of the Czech Republic his new home. The Czech economy fared better than most of the old bloc countries and a growing wave of tourism allowed Slava to focus on his painting skills, creating watercolours and cityscapes of Prague. He still felt he wasn’t expressing himself enough in his work. Spending evenings with fellow artists in cafes discussing art and their impressions of the world around them focused Slava in his pursuit for a style all his own.

Slava’s art testifies to his keen sense of humour and his limitless imagination. He is both an observer and a student of life. His paintings, which are all about living and people, serve as his silent ambassadors.

Solo show September 15th – 29th

Picnic Under Trees
Oil on Canvas
1100mm x 850mm
POA

My Grandma’s Kitchen
Oil on Canvas
1200mm x 800mm
POA

Afternoon Chess Party
Oil on Canvas
1100mm x 850mm
POA

Blue Jazz II
Oil on Canvas
1050mm x 850mm
POA

Happy Violinist
Oil on Canvas
900mm x 900mm
POA

All That Jazz III
Oil on Canvas
1050mm x 850mm
POA

Lucky Fishermen
Oil on Canvas
1050mm x 850mm
POA

after chess party

After Chess Party
Oil on Canvas
1050mm x 850mm
POA

Mediterranean Summer
Oil on Canvas
1050mm x 850mm
POA

Brave Sailor
Oil on Canvas
80mm x 650mm
POA